free bee removal Guyton GA

professional bee removal

Honey bees will normally build a hive in an open covered area of your building where there is no insulation. If you believe you have a hive of honey bees in your Guyton home more than likely they are in between the floors of your home. Our process for removing the honey bees is to go into the hive from underneath keeping your repair bill down with only drywall repair.

Bee Hive Removal - Why You Should Not Wait

Even though the honey bees are entering your Guyton home at one place does not mean that is where the beehive is. They can travel behind the wall all the way up to the soffit.

It helps if you can take pictures of the area they are entering your home and send them to us. We can do a lot of assessment with your pictures before we arrive. We will ask you questions when we call about the structure so we can be ready with the tools needed to do the bee removal job properly in Guyton GA.


cost of bee removal

Tips to Remove Bees

Most people are not an expert on beehive removal or bee removal in [post_name]. When the homeowner discovers a hive most are worried about being stung and will just leave it be. It is advisable that if you find a beehive on your [post_name] property call a professional to look at. The reason is that even a small hive can become a nuisance quickly, especially around springtime. At this time, they are going out to find a new home and lay eggs. The queen bee can produce thousands of eggs every day and continually reproduce during the warm months. That tiny hive could double or triple in size and by midsummer, there could be twenty thousand bees in the hive. The hive has everything that the needs for survival, which includes pollen, honey, worker bees, and larvae. The small hive may only weigh a few pounds but if it is an established and active beehive, there could be over one hundred pounds of honey in the combs. As you can see this type of hive can make beehive removal potentially messy and more difficult.

During the summer when the temperature starts to rise, the beehive will rely on the bees to help keep the wax inside the hive cool. If the hive is left alone for any reason, the wax can start to melt and cause the hive to collapse. Attempting to move its contents and hive can be costly and difficult. With any beehive removal the sooner the problem is taken care of the less complicated and expensive it will be.

If you have no experience removing a beehive it is best to call a professional as they have the tools and protective coverings to do the job so they do not get stung.


bee hive removal

Bee Removal Methods

"Without husbandry, "soil science" too easily ignores the community of creatures that live in and from, that make and are made by, the soil. Similarly, "animal science" without husbandry forgets, almost as a requirement, the sympathy by which we recognize ourselves as fellow creatures of the animals." [i] Wendell Berry

The big lesson of the 20th century was this: the way we treat the natural world has repercussions way beyond the immediately obvious. Our destruction of rainforests and other habitats in the name of 'progress' has triggered irrevocable, cumulative cycles of species loss, soil erosion and climate change that we are only beginning to understand and that will haunt us for generations.

From here, we can look back over the last 150 years and see how commercial beekeeping developed from the Victorian desire to dominate the natural world and subjugate its inhabitants to the will of man. This was the dominant paradigm throughout the first two thirds of the twentieth century, until we began to wake up to what was happening to the planet as a result of our arrogant assumption that we could treat it as a bottomless waste pit.

Some of us looked out at decimated forests, depleted soil and polluted water and realised that we had collectively to change our ways.

The subsequent - and now rapid - growth of the organic food movement indicates the beginnings of a shift in human perception, while the global dominance of a handful of agri-chemical corporations, intent on covering the earth with their genetically mutated organisms and chemical-dependent crops, represents the old order, stubbornly clinging to outmoded, reductionist science as their gospel and taking their moral guidance and business model from drug pushers.

So it is with the bees. Since L. L. Langstroth introduced us to the wonders of his movable-frame hive, we have assumed that we know better than they do what living conditions they require, what size cells they prefer to build, how many colonies can live in close proximity - and every other detail of their lives down to the mating of their queens, we have sought to bring under our control. And now we are reaping the rewards of our arrogance: bees that are dependent for their survival on chemical inputs and human interventions, and which abandon their hives in growing numbers.

Can this situation be reversed? Nobody can say for sure, but those of us who are experimenting with sustainable beekeeping systems believe that the answer lies in a low-tech, low-impact approach, that allows bees to build comb according to their own design, eliminating the artificial constraints imposed on them by the use of frames and foundation.

Foundation - thin sheets of wax impressed with the beginnings of hexagonal cells - was introduced as a way of 'helping' the bees; saving them some work and therefore redirecting their energy towards doing more work for us, i.e. making more honey. Because it is milled to what has been decreed is the 'correct' cell size for worker bees, then that is what the bees are more-or-less forced to build. Because the generally adopted cell size of worker foundation is 0.3-0.5mm larger than those that feral bees build un-aided, this has led to an overall increase in the size of the bees themselves, due to the fact that they grow to the capacity of the cells in which they pupate.

In practical terms, sustainability may mean accepting lower honey production per colony in return for healthier bees [post_name]. It may mean - at least in the short term - accepting heavier winter losses in return for improved vigour in surviving colonies. It almost certainly means increased vigilance in inspecting colonies and assessing desirable traits, which will mean that more beekeepers will need to educate themselves beyond a basic level in bee husbandry and breeding, and that can be no bad thing.

The remedy, as well as the blame, for the current parlous state of beekeeping lies with beekeepers themselves: nobody else knows enough or cares enough to take the necessary action. We need to share more information with each other and make more effort to educate the public, especially the next generation.

We may need to re-think much of what we now take for granted, even if it means discarding protocols we have regarded as holy writ for the last 150 years. We may have to think the unthinkable: that commercial-scale beekeeping is inherently unsustainable. After all, keeping 50 or 100 or more beehives in the [post_name] area that nature might furnish with only one or two colonies is very like cramming 10,000 chickens into a battery farm and has similar implications for aberrant behaviour and spread of diseases.

I am now looking at beekeeping as more of a conservation and restoration project than a profitable sideline. Much as I love honey, I am more interested in breeding bees that can look after themselves. I don't know to what extent I will succeed, but in its first year, over 500 people have joined our online forum and by freely sharing information, we are developing a balanced system of beekeeping that is becoming genuinely sustainable.

A key test of intelligence is the ability to adapt one's behaviour according to feedback from the environment. The feedback from the bees right now is surely telling us to change our ways or lose them forever, and thereby risk sealing our own fate. We must look more closely at our complicity in the over-use of agricultural chemicals and find better ways to achieve our goal of a fair honey crop than the propagation of poisons. We must accept that synthesized treatments for mites and brood diseases are ultimately doomed to failure, as they inevitably create dependency. The real answer lies with the bees themselves. Our job is to provide them with the best possible conditions in which they can solve their own problems, as they have always done.

[i] From 'Renewing Husbandry', Orion magazine Sept/Oct 2005
[ii] Varroa destructor - a parasitic mite, now widespread throughout the beekeeping world


Previous | Next